Broadband industry likes the names of nonsense

AT & T, 10G, technology, 5G networks, AT & T phones, t-mobile, 5G phone, internet, mobile network, mobile, technologies, tech, tech news, news, 5g,
Broadband industry likes the names of nonsense

Broadband industry likes the names of nonsense
I have heard of 5G. Now meet 5G E, 5G TF, and 10G

Your Internet provider thinks you are dumb. 
Between "counterfeit" schemes, false fees, and simply not providing promised speed, companies such as Verizon, AT & T, Comcast and Spectrum are using dubious claims and brands to rotate their customers for years. 

Now, as we approach the era of Internet speed and wired speeds faster, the strangeness of modern marketing shows that this kind of insult to your intelligence will get worse.

The latest round revolves around companies that pretend to reach or beat 5G without actually delivering 5G. 

There are AT & T, which renamed parts of its 4G LTE network as "5G E"; Verizon, which launched a home Internet service using a non-standard 5G TF; the cable industry, which is trying to upgrade your wireless company with ads for a non-existent service Called "10G".

AT & T, 10G, technology, 5G networks, AT & T phones, t-mobile, 5G phone, internet, mobile network, mobile, technologies, tech, tech news, news, 5g,
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All these names are nonsense. 
It misleads marketing campaigns that seem to be designed to rely on technology confusion to be able to buy in next-generation technology that they do not actually get.

It is no secret that these companies know what they are doing. 
As AT & T's chief executive said last month while defending the 5G E brand, "Every company is guilty of building an account of how it wants the world to operate." In other words, every company really revolves around marketing.

Every company revolves around the fact of marketing
AT & T got the most attention to its strong use for E 5G, but the cable industry appeared recently was probably the worst bid for the brand: 10G

Cable sets are hailing as the next big thing in wired broadband, with speeds that will one day increase over what we currently have, opening up new and wonderful avenues for technology that would not have been possible without them. 

The sound is supposed to be better and faster than the 5G, but the service does not actually exist.

The name on its own is misleading. 
Despite being larger than 5G, numerically speaking, 10G is not comparable. 

5G refers to the fifth generation of mobile broadband technology, while 10G refers to a 10GB speed, the promised data rate that cable carriers hope to offer for a day.

The 10G brand ostensibly aims to start the delivery of those high-speed speeds. 

It was announced last month as a joint venture from various cable industry groups, including NCTA and Cable Europe, supported by Comcast, Charter, Cox, Rogers, Vodafone, and more.

AT & T, 10G, technology, 5G networks, AT & T phones, t-mobile, 5G phone, internet, mobile network, mobile, technologies, tech, tech news, news, 5g,
10G

In fact, it is a meaningless marketing term based on a simple hypothesis: 5G networks are promising speeds that can, for the first time, seriously threaten wired home broadband with a kind of ease of use and a broad offering that only wired connections will be able to keep pace with. 
If there is anything the cable industry hates more than its customers, it is competition.

If there is anything the cable industry hates more than its customers, it is competition
It seems that the only reason for the current 10G initiative is to make the cable industry appear to have topped the 5G by putting a larger number in front of G. 

In fact, cable companies are already struggling to deliver much slower speeds, not to mention anything close to 10 Gbps at the consumer level wide range.

(Some local ISPs have managed to manage it, but on an incredibly small scale). 

The average download speed for broadband customers in the United States was 72 Mbps near the end of 2017, or 0.72 percent of the 10Gpbs target promised, according to the FCC. Latest Broadband Report.

10G may have been born out of fear of 5G, but even members of the wireless industry are afraid to be beaten to 5G by their competitors, leading to fake 5G programs with equally fake names.

It should not be surprising to come up with the worst of these brand stunts from AT & T, which basically pretends to own a 5G nationwide network. 

You can not be faulted for assuming the "5G E" code that began to appear in the corner of AT & T phones - including the iPhone - and as a sign at the end of some recent AT & T ads meant that the company had deployed a 5G network. That did not happen.

Instead, AT & T decided to update the latest LTE upgrades as "5G Evolution". Worse, both T-Mobile and Verizon have won AT & T to deploy these LTE updates in months.



So that the name of the 5G E looks like a designer to be confused, with the "G" in the "5G" that already ends on the sound of "E". 

(I can already imagine the Abbott and Costello routine at the local AT & T store: "Is this a 5G phone?" "No, it's 5G E!")

You may have also seen Verizon boast of being "the first of 5G". The company mainly published a fake version of only 5G for bragging rights.

Verizon launched a 5G Internet home service back in October, but used a different method in 5G than the rest of the industry. 

So Verizon does not plan to use this version of 5G, commonly known as 5G TF, for its own mobile network. It will actually use 5G NR, agreed standard.

Making all this more ironic, Verizon plans to replace the existing 5G TF devices (both on towers and consumers) with 5G devices based on bottom-line standards. 

Verizon will not expand until the Home 5G service is available until the device is ready, making it even clearer that the initial deployment was for display only.

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For both AT & T and Verizon, the brand is working nonsense by clicking on confusion about these new technologies. 

In fact, the 5G E service from AT & T uses technologies that will benefit early 5G, as the 5G will initially be built on LTE. Verizon's 5G TF uses many of the same technologies that go into NG 5G. 

But in the end, the two companies are working on the ambiguity of lines against a universally agreed standard, and what is not used by itself. 

5G E is still only LTE, and 5G TF is not compatible with the rest of the 5G world.

Bad names work, otherwise companies will stop doing so
Internet providers have tried these tricks before naming. During the transition to LTE, AT & T insisted on referring to 3G-enhanced HSPA + speeds as "4G". 

Well done T-Mobile. People are supposed to fall for it, otherwise these companies will not continue to invest time and money in sites and designs.
It is likely to take a year or more before the fifth generation bulletins actually begin to spread in the United States, and the 5G phones are found in a large number of consumers' hands. 

It will be longer before 10 GB speeds become a viable option for people. 

Until then, we may see only more of this brand that has two floors, where ISPs try to compete with each other in a battle around faster false speeds.

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