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Autonomous Vehicles, Drones, Massachusetts Institute Of Technology, technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, help of GPS, tech, tech news, latest tech news, help forest rescue operations,
New independent UAV fleets help forest rescue operations

latest tech news
New independent UAV fleets help forest rescue operations
Each quad-carotone drone is equipped with laser gauges to locate, localize and plan the route. When a UAV is flying, it creates a three-dimensional map of the Earth.

Autonomous Vehicles, Drones, Massachusetts Institute Of Technology, technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, help of GPS, tech, tech news, latest tech news, help forest rescue operations,

The system allows unmanned aerial vehicles to interactively explore the terrain by using on-board computing and wireless communication only under dense forest umbrellas where GPS signals can not be relied upon. (Source: MIT)

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have developed an independent system of unmanned drones that can interactively search for hikers under dense forest umbrellas, without the help of GPS

The system allows unmanned aerial vehicles to interactively explore the terrain by using on-board computing and wireless communication only under dense forest umbrellas where GPS signals can not be relied upon.

"Basically, we're replacing humans with a fleet of unmanned aerial vehicles to make the search part of the search and rescue process more efficient," said lead author Yulan Tian of MIT at the AeroAstro Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. 
Each quad-carotone drone is equipped with laser gauges to locate, localize and plan the route. 

When a UAV is flying, it creates a three-dimensional map of the Earth. 

Algorithms help identify unexplored sites that have already been searched, so they know when you've selected an entire area. 

An external ground station integrates individual maps of multiple unmanned aircraft into a global three-dimensional map that can be observed by rescuers.


The team tested several unmanned drones in a simulation of the randomly generated forest and tested two unmanned aircraft in a forested area at NASA's Langley Research Center in Virginia, United States. 

In both experiments, each unmanned aircraft drew approximately 20 square meters in about two to five minutes, and maps were designed together in real time.

Unmanned drones worked well across several measures, including speed and total time to complete the mission, detect forest characteristics and accurately integrate maps, the researchers said.

Tian pointed out that producing a three-dimensional map is more reliable than simply connecting a camera to an unmanned aircraft and monitoring video feed. 

The results will be presented at the International Symposium on the Experimental Robotics Conference, to be held in Buenos Aires, Argentina, from 5 to 8 November.

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